Illinois LPN Requirements and Training Programs

IllinoisNursing is an ideal profession if you’re committed to making a difference in the lives of others. It entails working long hours caring for sick or injured patients. Decision makers at health care facilities recognize LPNs as a source of savings in this time of limited financial resources. These professionals earn less than Registered Nurses but can perform many of the same functions – while staying within the Federal and State outlined scope of practice. LPN training ensures prospective nurses develop the skills to care for patients with simple and predictable health needs. Upon completion of the training, graduate nurses can take the state licensure exam to practice in Illinois. As employees, LPNs play an active role in the planning, implementation and assessment of patient care plans, perform specialized functions, record vital signs, dress wounds, observe patients and report adverse changes to RNs and physicians.

Get Your Degree!

Find schools and get information on the program that’s right for you.

Powered by Campus Explorer

LPN Programs in Illinois:

LPN Training Illinois: Prerequisites and Program Content

LPN training equips students with knowledge in the clinical and didactic areas in the field of nursing. Graduates are prepared to care for sick and injured patients in hospitals, nursing homes, physicians’ offices and outpatient clinics.

In the classroom, students receive a solid foundation in the areas of nursing concepts, medical-surgical nursing, adult-geriatrics, pharmacology, obstetrics, maternal-newborn nursing, growth and development, microbiology, mental health nursing, and transition to practice. They also cover nutrition, community health, and working relationships.

Sessions in the schools’ simulated labs prepare students to offer life-saving support and hands-on care to patients. During the clinical externship in hospitals, nursing homes, and other health care facilities, students work as a part of a healthcare team under the direction of a licensed instructor.

Before enrolling in a program, make sure it is approved by the IDFPR to meet the requirements for state licensure. There are currently 46 programs approved by the Division, but due to limitations of space in the classroom and nursing facilities for the clinical experience, competition may be fierce. Regularly scheduled information sessions outline the requirements for admission, course schedules, course expectations including those for the clinical experience, and program outline.

To be eligible, you should complete the school’s application, provide official high school transcripts or GED, college transcripts, passage of the entrance exam, two letters of professional reference, immunization, and TB clearance. Some colleges may require completion of prerequisite courses, such as English composition, mathematics, medical terminology, chemistry, biology, and the basic CNA program.

Program graduates are prepared to take the NCLEX-PN for state licensure.

Duration and Cost of Training: Current tuition for a 12-month full-time program is approximately $15,800. The advertised rates at most schools is for tuition only, and does not include other expenses, such as textbooks, clinical supplies, uniform, liability insurance, admissions fees, lab fees, and transport to the clinical sites. Part-time students may pay more for training. Repeating courses and prerequisite requirements may also increase the total cost of attendance. Financial assistance may be available through several resources, including Pell Grants, Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Stafford Loans, private loans, and scholarships. Contact the school’s financial aid office and fill out your financial aid applications early.

NCLEX Illinois

New graduates must complete the NCLEX as the final step to practicing as Licensed Practical Nurses. The Computer Adaptive Test evaluates your memorization and critical thinking skills. Reviewing the topics covered during the nursing education program should be all the preparation you need to pass the licensing exam. The test comprises of a minimum 75 questions, but could get up to 265 questions based on your responses during the 5-hour long exam.

Before you can take the exam, you must submit a licensure application to Continental Testing Services who will review your application, criminal background results, and nursing education transcript to determine your eligibility to take the exam. Register with Pearson Vue and pay the $200 application fee, using a Visa or MasterCard, at the same time you submit the application to CTS. Registration is available using the toll-free hotline at 1.866.496.2539, or you can create an account to submit your registration over the internet.

Pearson Vue will issue the Authorization to Test (ATT) with CTS approval. Make sure to provide a valid email to during the registration process, as Pearson Vue communicates using email only.

Follow the instructions on the ATT to schedule your examination appointment. The ATT expires within 90 days of submission, which means you must schedule and take the test within the appointed time. For special accommodations, submit a request before the exam date. Testing centers are available in Peoria, Springfield, Chicago, Buffalo Grove, and Schaumburg.

The ATT and Candidate Bulletin contain vital information for scheduling and preparing for exam day, so review these resources carefully to avoid costly mistakes. Your scores will be available to CTS within a few days after testing, and the administration will issue your license if you succeed. You will receive a Candidate Performance Report (CPR) outlining your performance in different sections if you fail the exam.

Retake applicants must wait a minimum 45 days prior to testing again. If you must retake the exam, you’ll need to submit a new application to CTS and another registration request to Pearson Vue along with the accompanying fees. You won’t need to submit another verification of your education and fingerprints to retake the exam.

The application remains valid for up to three years. If you fail to pass the exam within the three-year period, you must retake the LPN program before submitting another request to take the exam.

Illinois LPN Licensure Requirements

In accordance with the Illinois Nurse Practice Act, any individual practicing or offering to practice as a practical nurse in Illinois shall submit evidence of his or her qualification to practice and obtain a license from the Board.

There are three ways to obtain a license to practice: examination, endorsement, and restoration. All applicants for initial licensure or restoration must complete a criminal background check and provide evidence of fingerprinting the Illinois State Police or another approved agency.

Candidates for the licensure exam must submit the application for licensure and fee to Continental Testing Service.

The IDFPR prohibits nurses from practicing until the successful passage of the Department approved licensure exam and receipt of official CTS notification. The applicant may practice under direct supervision for a period of three months from the official date of passing the exam as outlined in the formal notice from the Department.

Licensure By Examination

The IDFPR requires graduate nurses to submit the application form, fee, and supporting documents to Continental Testing Services at:

Continental Testing Services Inc.

P.O. Box 100

LaGrange, Illinois 60525-0100

  • Submit the application directly online or use the paper application to send your request by mail.
  • Enclose the non-refundable application fee of $98 using a certified check or money order made payable to Continental Testing Services, Inc.
  • Submit an original fingerprint receipt for a criminal background check. Fingerprint receipts are valid for 60 days only; if your receipt is older than 60 days, you will need to submit a new fingerprint receipt.
  • Provide proof of education. Approved nursing education programs submit an official roster of graduates or ED-NUR to CTS. The official roster, submitted by the school, is valid for 90 days only. If you do not submit an application for registration within the 90-day period, you must contact the school to submit a new roster or ED-NUR on your behalf. Graduates of out-of-state programs must have the registrar complete the ED-NUR form and send directly to CTS in a sealed envelope.
  • Complete and submit the Supporting Document CCA (Convicted of Criminal Acts) form. The agency will not process your application until you complete this form. If you answer “yes” to any questions, you must attached a certified copy of the court records relating to the conviction, the nature of the offense, and date of discharge.
  • Register for the NCLEX-PN with Pearson Vue.

Graduates of a foreign nursing program:

  • Submit a credentials evaluation report of the nursing education from the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS), Credentials Evaluation Service (CES) or the Educational Records Evaluation Service (ERES). The report should be completed based on the receipt and review of official transcripts from the nursing education program bearing the school seal and should indicate that the applicant is licensed in the country of education.
  • Include certification of passage of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the English Language Testing System (IELTS) General Training Module if English is not your first language. The Division may waive this requirement if you completed the nursing education program and licensing examination in English.

Applicants have three years from the date of the Department’s receipt of the application to submit supporting documents and complete the application process, including passage of the exam. Following this period, the Division will deny the application, and the applicant must reapply and meet the requirements for licensure.

Licensure By Endorsement

Endorsement applications, from nurses licensed in other jurisdictions, must go directly to IDFPR at the address provided below.

Submit the following for licensure by endorsement:

  • A completed Illinois application for licensure by endorsement.
  • The non-refundable application fee of $50 using a certified check or money order made payable to Department of Financial and Professional Regulation.
  • The TP-NUR Form and temporary permit fee if applying for a temporary permit. To qualify for the 6-month permit, you must provide a copy of all current active licenses or temporary permit.
  • An original fingerprint receipt for a criminal background check or a completed FP-NUR form. Fingerprint receipts are valid for 60 days only; if your receipt is older than 60 days, you will need to submit a new fingerprint receipt.
  • CT-NUR Form (Verification of Licensing Agency/Board) completed by your state of original licensure and any current state of licensure. The agency must return the form directly to the Division.
  • Proof of education. The Dean or Director of Nursing must complete the ED-NUR and affix a school seal or prepare an official transcript and return directly to the Division.
  • The Supporting Document CCA (Convicted of Criminal Acts) form. The agency will not process your application until you complete this form. If you answer “yes” to any questions, you must attached a certified copy of the court records relating to the conviction, the nature of the offense, and date of discharge.

Graduates of a foreign nursing program:

  • Submit a credentials evaluation report of the nursing education from the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS), Credentials Evaluation Service (CES) or the Educational Records Evaluation Service (ERES). The report should be completed based on the receipt and review of official transcripts from the nursing education program bearing the school seal, and should indicate that the applicant is licensed in the country of education.
  • Include certification of passage of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the English Language Testing System (IELTS) General Training Module if English is not your first language. The Division may waive this requirement if you completed the nursing education program and licensing examination in English.

Renewing Your LPN License

LPN licenses expire on January 31 of odd-numbered years. All LPNs must complete 20 hours of approved continuing education for every 2-year license renewal cycle. First-time renewals do not need to complete the CE requirements.

The IDFPR will send renewal notices for online renewal 4 to 6 weeks before the license expiration. It is important to maintain an accurate address with the Division. If your address changes, you should submit a Change of Address request to maintain an accurate record.

Salary and Job Outlook LPNs Illinois

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that jobs for licensed practical nurses will grow much faster than average, making it a good career prospect for candidates eager to enter the medical sector. However, the uncertain economy and employer hiring strategies appear to have a negative influence on the BLS’ outlook. In some sectors, particularly hospitals, employers are replacing LPNs with better-educated registered nurses. Although RNs nurses earn more and could place a strain on hospitals’ limited budgets, they fill larger roles and offer good value for money.

Approximately 1 out of every 10 LPNs in Illinois work in hospitals. The rest work in long-term care and community settings. The fact that LPN schools in Illinois produce more LPNs than available jobs also add to the problem. In spite of hospital administrators’ decision to move to more highly trained nursing staff, there is a current and future boom for LPNs in long-term care.

To put it into perspective, the BLS’ figures represent a shift in employer practices rather than just “hype” as touted by many disenchanted LPNs. The wide availability of nursing jobs in hospitals has come to an end due to the complexity of care required by acute-care patients. The duties performed by LPNs are split between CNAs and RNs with the CNAs assisting with personal care tasks and RNs completing those tasks requiring advanced skills.

Quoting the BLS “many procedures once performed only in hospitals are now being performed in physicians’ offices and outpatient care centers,” it appears that they clearly highlighted the shift in the industry. Therefore, the growth in demand for LPNs will increase in these facilities; not so much in the hospitals. Nevertheless, there will be a few opportunities for LPNs in hospitals for those who desire. Newly licensed LPNs will have to acquire appropriate experience before landing such a coveted position. The median annual wage for Illinois’s LPNs was $44,870 in May 2014.

Contact the Board of Nursing
Illinois Department of Professional Regulation

James R. Thompson Center
100 West Randolph, Suite 9-300
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: (312) 814-2715
Fax: (312) 814-3145

Illinois Board of Nursing Approved Training Programs and NCLEX Pass Rates

Alton, IL LPN Training Programs:
CALC Institute of Technology
200 E Center Dr, Alton, IL 62002, United States
(618) 474-0616
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Alsip, IL LPN Training Programs:
All American Nursing School
12250 S Cicero Ave, Alsip, IL 60803
(708) 396-8409
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Canton, IL LPN Training Programs:
Spoon River College
23235 N. County Highway 22, Canton, IL
(309) 647-4645
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Carterville, IL LPN Training Programs:
John A Logan Community College
700 Logan College Road, Carterville, IL 62918
(618) 985-3741
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 93%

Centralia, IL LPN Training Programs:
Kaskaskia College
27210 College Road, Centralia, IL 62801
(618) 545-3000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 92%

Champaign, IL LPN Training Programs:
Parkland College
2400 West Bradley Ave, Champaign, IL 61821
(217) 351-2200
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 88%

Chicago, IL LPN Training Programs:
City Colleges of Chicago – Wilbur Wright College
226 W. Jackson, Chicago, IL 60606
(312) 553-2500
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 85%

Great Paragon Healthcare Services
2640 W Touhy Ave #206, Chicago, IL 60645
(773) 973-1753
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 67%

Northwestern Institute of Health and Technology
4641 N. Ashland Ave., Chicago, IL 60640
(773) 506-2136
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 65%

PCCTI Healthcare
216 W. Jackson Blvd., Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60606
(312) 920-8822
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 85%

Chicago Public Schools
125 S. Clark St., Chicago, IL 60603
(773) 553-1000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 75%

ATS Institute of Technology
Shops at 25, 25 E Washington St #200, Chicago, IL 60602
(312) 214-2000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 63%

Cicero, IL LPN Training Programs:
Morton College
3801 S Central Ave,, Cicero, IL 60804
(708) 656-8000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Clarendon Hills, IL LPN Training Programs:
CMK Healthcare
115 55th Street, Clarendon Hills, IL 60515
(630) 537-1590
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 64%

Danville, IL LPN Training Programs:
Danville Area Community College
2000 East Main Street, Danville, IL
(217) 443-3222
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 92%

Decatur, IL LPN Training Programs:
Richland Community College
One College Park, Decatur, IL
(217) 875-7200
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 79%

Des Plaines, IL LPN Training Programs:
Oakton Community College
1600 East Golf Road, Des Plaines, IL
(847) 635-1600
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Dixon, IL LPN Training Programs:
Sauk Valley Community College
173 Illinois Route 2, Dixon, IL 61021
(815) 288-5511
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Dolton, IL LPN Training Programs:
Best-Med Care Institute
15008 Woodlawn Ave, Dolton, IL 60419, United States
(708) 841-2730
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

East Peoria, IL LPN Training Programs:
Illinois Central College
1 College Drive, East Peoria, IL
(309) 694-5422
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 96%

Elgin, IL LPN Training Programs:
Elgin Community College
1700 Spartan Drive, Elgin, IL
(847) 697-1000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

J’Renee’ Career Facilitation, Inc
Facilitation 415 Airport Rd, Elgin, IL 60123
(815) 444-7751
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 74%

Freeport, IL LPN Training Programs:
Highland Community College
2998 W. Pearl City Rd, Freeport, IL
(815) 235-6121
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: N/A

Galesburg, IL LPN Training Programs:
Carl Sandburg College
2400 Tom L. Wilson Blvd, Galesburg, IL 61401
(309) 344-2518
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 69%

Glen Ellyn, IL LPN Training Programs:
College of DuPage
425 Fawell Blvd, Glen Ellyn, IL 60137
(630) 942-2800
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 91%

Harrisburg, IL LPN Training Programs:
Southeastern Illinois College
3575 College Rd, Harrisburg, IL
(618) 252-5400
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 98%

Hoffman Estates, IL LPN Training Programs:
Ambria School of Nursing
5210 Trillium Blvd, Hoffman Estates, IL 60192
(847) 397-0300
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 93%

Ina, IL LPN Training Programs:
Rend Lake College
468 N. Ken Gray Parkway, Ina, IL
(618) 437-5321
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 96%

Joliet, IL LPN Training Programs:
Joliet Junior College
1215 Houbolt Road, Joliet, IL
(815) 729-9020
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Kankakee, IL LPN Training Programs:
Kankakee Community College
100 College Drive, Kankakee, IL 60901
(815) 802-8100
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Lincolnwood, IL LPN Training Programs:
International Career Institute
6425 N. Hamlin, Lincolnwood, IL 60712
(847) 929-6129
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 54%

Illinois College of Nursing
55 W 22nd St, Lombard, IL 60148, United States
(630) 495-7968
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Malta, IL LPN Training Programs:
Kishwaukee College
21193 Malta Road, Malta, IL
(815) 825-2086
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: N/A

Matteson, IL LPN Training Programs:
CAAN Academy of Nursing
4747 Lincoln Mall Drive, Suite 420, Matteson, IL 60443
(708) 983-1645
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Mattoon, IL LPN Training Programs:
Lake Land College
5001 Lake Land Blvd, Mattoon, IL
(217) 234-5253
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 94%

Moline, IL LPN Training Programs:
Black Hawk College
6600 34th Ave, Moline, IL 61265
(309) 796-5000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Normal, IL LPN Training Programs:
Heartland Community College
1500 West Raab Road, Normal, IL
(309) 268-8000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 94%

Oglesby, IL LPN Training Programs:
Illinois Valley Community College
815 North Orlando Smith Road, Oglesby, IL
(815) 224-2720
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 96%

Olney, IL LPN Training Programs:
Illinois Eastern Community Colleges
233 East Chestnut, Olney, IL 62450
(866) 529-4322
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 95%

Palatine, IL LPN Training Programs:
Harper College
1200 W Algonquin Rd, Palatine, IL 60067, United States
(847) 925-6000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Palos Hills, IL LPN Training Programs:
Moraine Valley Community College
9000 W. College Pkwy., Palos Hills, IL 60465
(708) 974-4300
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 89%

Park Ridge, IL LPN Training Programs:
Americare Technical School
505 Busse Highway, Park Ridge, IL 60068
(847) 825-8773
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 85%

Quincy, IL LPN Training Programs:
John Wood Community College
1301 South 48th Street, Quincy, IL
(217) 224-6500
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Red Bud, IL LPN Training Programs:
Beck Area Career Center
6137 Beck Rd, Red Bud, IL 62278
(618) 473-2222
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 96%

River Grove, IL LPN Training Programs:
Triton College
2000 Fifth Ave, River Grove, IL
(708) 456-0300
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Rockford, IL LPN Training Programs:
Rock Valley College
3301 North Mulford Road, Rockford, IL
(815) 921-7821
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

South Holland, IL LPN Training Programs:
South Suburban College
15800 South State Street, South Holland, IL
(708) 596-2000
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 100%

Springfield, IL LPN Training Programs:
Lincoln Land Community College
5250 Shepherd Road, Springfield, IL 62794
(217) 786-2200
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 89%

Capital Area School of Practical Nursing
2201 Toronto Rd, Springfield, IL 62712
(217) 585-1215
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 96%

Ullin, IL LPN Training Programs:
Shawnee Community College
8364 College Road, Ullin, IL
(618) 634-3200
NCLEX-PN Pass Rate: 97%

 

Get Your Degree!

Find schools and get information on the program that’s right for you.

Powered by Campus Explorer

47 thoughts on “Illinois LPN Requirements and Training Programs”

    1. Not true.. I worked 10 yrs Cook County Hosp.. neonatal icy, med onc, med surg, Ob,.20 yrs Cook County Jail..simultaneously worked case management with State of ILL.. Then went back to Home Health .. Worked 6/8 hrs day , saw 30 patients week $40/$3 gas mileage… Do that math.. Retired@ 51.. I’m 55 now..rotfl

  1. Amen Kris my daughter is an lpn also.its easy for ones that can afford more school or don’t have family to take care of maybe I’m Wrong maybe they do ,but don’t degrade someone that is an lpn. Hope I didn’t offend anyone but opinion.

  2. Just an lpn….seriously? I care for critical infants requiring mechanical ventilation to breath and I work in their homes without a doctor or rt or anyone to assist! And I make 30.00 an hour!

  3. Gracie. Getting a RN is a good ideal.but you making a comment as can lpn are just certificates is just plain rude.I’m a cna and yes its a certificate but a cna is the back bone of lpn and RN we do one of the most nastiest jobs and get paid very little.but I think your words was just plain rude and insulting. Hope you never need just a cna to wipe your ass or just a lpn to give you something for pain.

  4. I have taken the initiative to read these comments left well over a year ago. I am a proud board-certified med-surg master’s prepared RN who teach for both an LPN and RN program. My nursing career began as a LPN back in the day and while waiting for results from taking the NCLEX-PN exam (on paper back then) I asked to work as a CNA so I could experience what life was like for them. I am most certainly glad I did—- Some of the nurses both RN’s and LPN’s treated the CNA’s like crap. It saddened me to think that any human being would feel as though they are entitled to mistreat anyone. As nurses we take an oath to provide care holistically and to save lives if deemed appropriate. What I know to be factual is everyone has a title whether it is CNA, LPN, RN, DON, housekeeper, activity aid, etc. It is the collaboration of all of these roles that allow for a smooth operation inside a facility. We need one another to get the job done so instead of demeaning one over the other or bashing who’s doing and not doing what and or who is or isn’t getting paid lets think about why we are doing what we do… You just might need that CNA to bring you a cup of water or that LPN to change your bandage. What ever the need know that all lives matter and the care we all provide is equally important.
    Lastly, I have worked with and beside some of the BEST LPN’s and CNA’s who I would entrust my life in their hands. I make sure to treat them with dignity and respect that I would want for myself because trust me the CNA will notice a change in your patient’s condition before you will so there should be a therapeutic level of communication that’s going to always put the patient’s needs first above our own.
    There are also plenty of jobs out there for everyone… Remember there’s a grand shortage of nurses and the numbers aren’t dwindling. The impact at current reflects cross-training expecting us to do more working with less which is a reflection of the shortage of nursing staff we are experiencing. I embrace anyone in nursing no matter what your title I applaud you…. and tip my hat to you for embarking upon a career many don’t have the guts or patience to do….
    Tonya L. Woods, MSN,RN-BC

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *